During the winter, advertisers tend to offer refuge to the public by installing heated units into bus shelters or street furniture. These installations increase the amount of dwell time and exposure to their brand. Sit back with a warm drink and read on for some creative examples - from Kraft in the USA, to Chocomel in the Netherlands and more:

Orkusalan, Iceland:

The electricity company, Orkusalan, created a warm retreat for the public in Reykjavik . The neon sign on top that translates to "fun shelter" helped to attract passers by.
There was access to free wireless internet that accompanied a very bright animated poster.

Chocomel, Netherlands:

Cold passers-by could warm themselves up in the bus shelter at the Leidseplein in Amsterdam by putting their hands in the cut-away shapes on the posters.
Their hands felt pleasantly warm, as if they were holding a mug of hot chocolate.
 

Andrélon, Netherlands:

The text on this shampoo advert translates to 'a little summer in the winter,' and that's exactly what JCDecaux brought to the streets of the Netherlands for this innovative campaign.
 

Pressbyrån, Sweden:

Pressbyrån, one of the largest convenience stores in Sweden teamed up with JCDecaux to advertise their winter promotion on the street. They had a great price on 'saffron buns' (a typical Swedish Christmas-bun) and created an engaging campaign to alert the public.
People were asked to place their hands on the large saffron bun to warm their frozen hands. At the same time they felt the scent of Christmas.
 

Vattenfall, Sweden:

Vattenfall, one of Europe's largest energy suppliers promoted their company through heated bus shelters in Sweden. The public were invited to "come in and warm up" and instructed to "press here if you're freezing."
 

British Gas, UK:

The warming campaign ran over the festive season as a reminder that British Gas are available 24/7, even during Christmas.
 

Kraft, USA:

JCDecaux fitted heated units inside 10 bus shelters in downtown Chicago for Kraft Foods' Stove Top range.
Kraft gave samples of a new variety of Stove Top, called Quick Cups, to commuters and passers-by at half of the heated shelters. Such “experiential marketing” is intended to entice consumers to experience products or brands tangibly rather than bombard them with pitches.
“Advertisers are looking for new and unique ways of reaching, and reaching out to, consumers,” said Jean-Luc Decaux, co-chief executive at JCDecaux North America in New York  

Tylenol, USA: